Find It GameI love using games in therapy, and kids love playing games in therapy!  Last week I posted about the use of the Jenga game as a therapeutic intervention during counseling sessions.  It’s an excellent resource for just about any topic or skill that you’re trying to teach to kids, adolescents, and adults alike.  I use a number of games in therapy sessions, both therapeutic and “non-therapeutic.”  The difference between the two is what their intent and purpose was when the game makers created them.  “Non-therapeutic” games are simply those that you can find at your local department store in the game aisle, like Candy Land, Jenga, and Operation, but in my experience, ANY game, regardless of its intent during creation, can be made therapeutic.  Today’s game can be found in both therapy resource catalogs AND the game aisle.

Find It as a Therapeutic Intervention

Find It, like Jenga, is another one of my favorite “non-therapeutic” games to use as a therapeutic intervention with children and adolescents.  Find It is a classic I Spy game that comes in a nice sturdy cylindrical container filled with miscellaneous small objects to find (e.g., a rubber band, an eraser, a feather, etc.) that are hidden in a colorful array of beads, pebbles, or dried rice (depending on which version of Find It that you choose).  I primarily use the game with children and teens that I’m treating for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or who have other issues in which they have difficulty with focus and attention.  I use the game to help improve their concentration and focus, as well as to informally assess their distress tolerance.  The object of the game is simple:  Find as many objects from an included list as you can.  You can do this activity timed or take as long as you need.

The first time I give a child the Find It game during session, I collect baseline data by setting a time limit (for example, 10 or 15 minutes) and assess how many objects they can find within that given time frame.  The game itself includes a small notepad checklist, so we mark each item off as it is found.  I write down the time limit I give the child (whether it was 10 or 15 minutes) and the number of objects found, and then I put the information in the child’s file so I can access it in future sessions.

How Often to Use Find It in Session

We play the game intermittently; the next time we play the game is generally a few sessions after I’ve collected the initial baseline data.  The sessions in between are spent doing other focus improving activities in order to help the child develop his or her skills.  When we play the game again, I give the child the same time limit as before.  Again the child is asked to perform the same task:  Find as many objects as possible before time is up.  The objects are never in the same place as they were initially, as each movement of the container shakes and jumbles the objects around.  I record the data afterward, just as I did the first time the child played.  This time I’m looking to assess whether the child’s scores (number of objects found in a given time) have improved as a result of our working on their focus, concentration, and attention span.

Find It as a Tool to Improve Distress Tolerance

Find It also allows me to see how a child tolerates the distress and frustration that comes with sometimes having difficulty finding the small objects.  During game play, if a child is becoming noticeably distressed, I teach coping and self-regulation methods that they can use to slow down and bring their focus back to the game again.  Between sessions, we will work on improving the child’s distress tolerance and learning effective coping skills to help handle frustration.

How Long to Use the Find It Game

I generally give the child the Find It game and assess their focus once every few sessions until I see that their scores have significantly improved and/or their distress tolerance is handled appropriately on a consistent basis.  Once I see that the child has improved, we put the game away, though the child usually ends up getting it out at the beginning or end of future sessions as a transition activity.

 

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